Event

OK Cupid do your best, while I Bumble around Tindering for my love, a hook-up or a FWB…!

Tue 16th Feb 2021

This presentation will describe the rationale for the ‘COVID-19: Dating Apps, Social Connections, Loneliness and Mental Health in a pandemic’ project. Prior to the pandemic, dating apps have become an integral form for many citizens in society to elicit emotional, sexual, and intimate relationships and connections. However, little is known about the use, impacts, barriers, and enablers to using dating apps, pre-pandemic and even more so since the pandemic. However, given the phenomenal rise of dating apps, accessible for download via iTunes and Google Play Store, coupled with citizens young and old turning to alternative ways of finding a connection and/or companion, dating apps are here to stay.

A recent paper by Marston and colleagues (2020) explores the use of dating apps from a life course perspective specifically with two cohorts – older adults and young people with life-limiting/threatening health conditions. This paper presents an in-depth review of the various dating apps developed for all citizens in society, religions, and sexualities. A series of recommendations are proposed as a route map for moving the narrative forward from both the perspectives of research, industry, and policy.

Register for the webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5050784094976069648 


Dr Deborah Morgan

Deborah is a senior research officer in the Centre for Innovative Ageing at Swansea University who specialises in loneliness and social isolation in later life. She has a background in social gerontology, sociology and health and social care.

Deborah’s PhD focused on transitions in loneliness and social isolation in later life. Her research interests include older adults, loneliness and social isolation health/social inequalities, disability and chronic illness, and new ageing populations.

@lonelyDeborah

Dr Hannah R. Marston

Dr Hannah R. Marston is a Research Fellow in the Health and Wellbeing Strategic Research Area at The Open University, UK. She gained her PhD in Virtual Reality and Gerontology from Teesside University, UK in 2010, focusing on digital game habits of older people. Her research is both inter-and-multi-disciplinary intersecting across the fields of gerontechnology, social sciences, and technology.

Between 2015 and 2017 she led the Technology In Later Life (TILL) international study and is currently leading 2 COVID-19 research project. 1. the COVID-19: Technology, Social Connections, Loneliness and Leisure Activities international study; 2. COVID-19: Dating Apps, Social Connections, Loneliness and Mental Health in a Pandemic study. With colleagues, she recently wrote two blogs relating to the unfolding societal situation surrounding digital technology use by citizens, communities and organisations: 1. Lockdown 2.0: Gunpowder Plot, Digital Christmas, Sex and Relationships, 2. COVID-19: vs Social Isolation: the Impact Technology can have on Communities, Social Connections and Citizens. Hannah is a Co-I on a third COVID-19 research project ‘Vulnerable young people living with life-limiting/life-threatening conditions and their families’.

To date she has published over 40 journal papers, 9 book chapters, and has presented her work both to policy makers at the Northern Irish Assembly and as a keynote presenter at the ‘International Child and Information Safety Congress ‘Digital Games’, Turkey (2018). In September 2020, she was a panel member on the ‘Game and Interaction design for Older Adults: That Means You (Someday)’, forming part of the PAXOnline schedule. Previously, Hannah has held a position on the National Executive Committee of the British Society of Gerontology, and in 2009 she was elected to serve as the Communications Chair of the Emerging Scholar & Professional Organization (ESPO) – Gerontological Society of America. Hannah has published one edited book and is currently writing a book with colleagues titled ‘Technology, Boomers, Millennials and Gen Z’ which will be published by Emerald.

Hannah conducts reviews for a variety of journals and conferences from the fields of Gerontology, Gerontechnology, HCI, and Games Studies. In 2020, she was invited to join the board of reviewers for Games Studies – the International Journal of Computer Game Research. This journal includes eminent scholars from the field of Games Studies. Hannah is also a member of The Computer Games Journal editorial board.

Prior to taking up her position at the Open University, Hannah worked as a research scientist at the German Sport University Cologne (DSHS) in Germany and after completing a fixed term contract with the Centre for Innovative Ageing in the summer of 2010, Hannah conducted a post-doctoral fellowship at the David R. Cheritan School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, Canada.

@HannahRMarston

 

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